Total 91Articles
News list
Content Forum List
2020-08 10 Important News

[Alumni]Jang Ki-min’s Design Economy Changes The Way We Think

Jang Ki-min (M.S. in Industrial Design, '12) is a Hanyang alumnus who aspires to present to his readers the revolutionary change we can make in our everyday thoughts. His new book Why Is Hongdae Filled with People Not Attending Hongik University? was published under the premise that our minds are trapped within conventional perspectives, and, through his book, Jang argues how important it is to think outside the box by giving his own interpretations of design and economy. On writing the book Jang is a pioneer in the study of the concept "design economy." After writing numerous columns for Maeil Business Newspaper, Kookmin University, and Myungji University on the topic of design economy, Jang said he decided to combine all his columns and make them into a single book. When he first wrote the script and sent it to publishing companies, he worried that no one would call him back for his manuscripts. However, 20 companies contacted him wanting to publish his book, and within the week of its publication, the book became one of Kyobo Book Centre’s bestsellers. Jang Ki-min (M.S. in Industrial Design, '12)'s new book Why Is Hongdae Filled with People Not Attending Hongik University? became one of Kyobo Book Centre's bestsellers within the week of its publication. (Photo courtesy of Jang) Why Is Hongdae Filled with People Not Attending Hongik University? The book starts with an interesting title, which is also the essence of one of the 47 economic theories introduced in the book, cognitive economics. “No one in South Korea thinks twice about having their meeting place be Hongdae. However, people hesitate to meet in other areas such as in front of Korea University." According to Jang, once the correlation between Hongdae and a so-called "hot place" is manifested, it leads to a conventional and almost unconscious decision of people to go to that place. This then leads to the commercial development of the place, creating a virtuous circle. Likewise, Jang argues that the design is not "to decorate." Rather, it is "to give meaning." The design - usually of social conventions - reshapes people's thoughts and decisions. Based on the concept of design economy, the book similarly draws attention to the various business or economic phenomenon occurred by design. By combining design with economic phenomena such as marketing, media, and start-ups, Jang presents the readers with unique ideas and new insights to realize the design economy surrounding them, and urges them to tackle these unconscious choices. Jang said he wants to change the way people make unconscious decisions in their lives. Jang also emphasized the power to think outside the box and to see through the essence of objects to his fellow Hanyang students. Instead of being confined to a limited way of thinking, Jang, as he expresses throughout his new book, hopes that people will develop the strength to think on their own. Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-08 06

[Alumni][ERICA’s Power] 34th ERICA Student Body President Jeon Yong-ki Becomes the Youngest Member of the National Assembly

ERICA Student Body President Jeon Yong-ki Becomes the Youngest Member of the National Assembly Alumnus Jeon Yong-ki (Division of Sport Science, Class of ’10) The number of newly-elected members of the 21st National Assembly is 151. As all citizen wish for a ‘working National Assembly,’ their expectations for the representatives are very high. There are different calls for change for the members in their 20s and 30s of the National Assembly than in previous political moments. Deputy Jeon Yong-ki is one of the members of the 21st National Assembly. As a former ERICA student body president, we asked him about youth politics, an area of the New Politics. ▲ Alumnus Jeon Yong-ki (Division of Sport Science, Class of ’10) A young deputy in his twenties, born by the hopes of the youth Deputy Jeon Yong-ki, who proudly made his entry to the 21st National Assembly has just started his work as a member. Born in 1991, he is the youngest member of the Democratic Party of Korea in history and the youngest male member of the National Assembly selected in the 21st Assembly election. “It didn’t feel real when I was elected. When it was time to go to the National Assembly, the responsibility came on me too heavily. I started my political activities by working for 3-4 years as the Chairman of the National University Student Council in the Democratic Party of Korea, and I am aware of how much my seniors have worked over the past 10 years to make members in their 20s and 30s of the National Assembly. I think my getting elected this time is the result of all that.” He has steered a great amount of interest by being elected 6 times as a proportional representative by breaking through the harsh proportional elections in the Democratic Party of Korea election process. It was a miracle, and everyone was surprised about how such a young person with only 4 years of political party experience received votes. His biggest supporters were none other than young partisans nationwide. The young partisans were the strongest and firmest strength during the 800,000 electoral colleges’ 1st election and the central committee's 2nd election. As a result, he firmly achieved 3rd place in the central committee election, constituted by the heads of the local government such as the members of the National Assembly, mayors, and governors. It was a moment of hope for young partisans. “One of the members of the central committee was very surprised at how I received such a large number of votes. In fact, he voted for me too but was 100% sure it was a wasted vote. He said he got lots of calls from young people asking him to vote for me. It is natural that he may not know what kind of young person I am because I have limited experience in politics. Nevertheless, he kept receiving calls from young partisans. He said he voted because he thought there would be a reason for it but could not expect how the result would turn out.” There were crises of changing the affiliated party to the Democratic Party of Korea and getting laid behind as the 16th in number on central committee, but in the end, he entered the 21st National Assembly due to the votes of numerous citizens. His election could be said as the result of efforts his seniors put in for a long time to make the 2030 National Assembly and the hopes of young people to build a National Assembly that can sympathize with them. ▲ Deputy Jeon Yong-ki had a leading role as the ERICA student body president in successfully drawing a consensus on "Prime Business 21," which had strong opposition due to department consolidation problems. A bigger world! Hanyang University, a life turning-point Alumnus Jeon Yong-ki (Division of Sport Science, Class of ’10) was a disciplined young man during his student years who put forth his best efforts in every aspect. As he was a bowler during his middle and high school years, he entered university as a student-athlete. The reason why he chose Hanyang University was to tie in his studies. “I made a promise to myself that when I went to university that I would not skip any lectures. Even if I was sick or drank a lot the day before, I always attended classes. I tried not to be absent even if I had to fall asleep during the class.” Because he studied diligently, he naturally received high grades and graduated 2nd in his class. His participation in the student council started after his service in the military. It was not that he was thinking of joining the student council from the beginning. In fact, he was running away with excuses to his seniors that suggested he participate. However, he could not find any more excuses when he realized that he could both study and hold office. As he has a personality of enjoying meeting people and not being able to stand it if things do not get done, he worked like a workaholic. After starting as a member of the student council, his role extended to the Department of Sports student vice-president, College of Sports and Arts student president, and then ERICA student body president in no time. ▲ Photo of "Prime Business 21" student body council His most memorable activities as the 34th ERICA student body president in 2016 are the prime business and the reformation of festival cultures. At that time, the opposing opinions of the prime business were strong due to the problems of department consolidation. For that reason, he thought there needed to be an opportunity for students to fully understand the necessity of the business and judge rationally. As a result, 1,300 students voted through the student council and 38.7% voted in favor. It was selected as the representative case of creating the best legislative organization that takes in the voices of students and derives a representative democracy. At that time, ERICA was the only university that presented a successful agreement and passed their evaluation with full marks on the "consensus with members" section. The transition from hosting festivals in Democracy Square for the last 30 years to the track and field was another unconventional move. “There were always problems with safety accidents as Democracy Square was too small. Therefore, we changed the festival location to the track and field. There were lots of disagreements, but we managed to persuade the doubters one by one.” The story of building waterways on the track and field floor by using a shovel with the members of the student council in heavy rain is famous. From that day, it has become a tradition to make waterways during the festival when it rains. “For me, Hanyang University is my life turning-point. I could finally realize how big the world is after coming to university. I built diverse things with friends from all backgrounds and got to see new worlds by meeting students from other departments. If I had not joined the student council or spoken up to society, I would have lived a life far from politics.” ▲ Alumnus Jeon Yong-ki (Division of Sport Sciences, Class of ’10) Anticipating the work of a young, generation-representing politician Deputy Jeon Yong-ki entered graduate school (Management Consulting, Class of ’17) after graduating in 2017 and made his mark on politics by playing the role as of the Democratic Party of Korea's 19th Presidential Election National Election Commission Youth Committee Director of Future Generation Joint Headquarters. After that, he worked as a Youth Policy Board researcher, National University Student Committee vice-president, and then president. After stepping into the National Assembly, he spoke of the New Politics. This means to approach politics from a new perspective. Many worry about his inexperience when looking at his relatively short time in politics, but thoughts do differ according to the generations. “I think there are limits to solving youth problems through the lenses of the older generations. When solving a problem, the right answer can come when solving it from a diverse perspective. That is the reason why there needs to be politicians who can represent different generations. Looking at the big picture, I want to be a politician that protects minorities. However, as of now, I want to try solving difficult situations that our generation is facing as a youth politician that stands with a generation-representativeness.” He defines politics as life. He says that the life of meeting people, connecting with others, and speaking for other people is politics. “I hope people’s awareness of politics can change. I hope people can learn the method of discussion and persuasion through politics. If that is achieved, healthy life politics like those of Northern Europe will be possible.” He is still cautious due to the responsibility to do well as a new member of the National Assembly, but Deputy Jeon Yong-ki speaks of his aspirations to carry out bold and reformative assembly activities. He is expected to grow into a passionate and challenging icon that is told “the young do things well as expected,” speaks for minorities as a young politician, and becomes a role-model for their juniors in school. Written by Oh In-sook Photo by Ha Ji-won This content is published in the Hanyang University Journal ‘HY ERICA’ 2020 Summer Edition (Volume 95) Click to see HY ERICA 2020 Summer Edition (Volume 95) Click to see ‘HY ERICA’, ‘Jeon Yong-ki’ in [[Hanyang Wiki]] Global News Team global@hanyang.ac.kr Translation by: Park Gyeong-min

2020-07 27

[Alumni]The Winner of Phantom Singer 3 and the Legendary Tenor, Yoo Chae-hoon

Hanyang University’s college of music has been a home to numerous influential musicians in South Korea. Yoo Chae-hoon (Department of Voice, '07) is also a proud alumnus of Hanyang and a famous tenor. His singing gained media coverage in Trot X, Who Does Better, and most recently, Phantom Singer 3, the TV audition show where Yoo won the championship on July 3, 2020. Entering the Department of Voice Yoo found his dream to become an opera singer thanks to his middle school teacher who, after seeing him perform as a vocalist for the school band, recommended that he major in opera. Following the recommendation, he was later accepted to Pohang Arts High School, where he continued to hone his opera singing skills. His unique strength of not being afraid to perform on stage and fearlessly challenging high pitches positioned him as the top student when he entered Hanyang University. Yoo recalled Hanyang University as “where he found his musical roots.” During his university life, which was full of practices, lessons, and lectures, he said he thought it was "the coolest thing" to leave the practice room as the last out of all his friends. His most remarkable memory was staying until 10:30 p.m. every day when the practice room closed. Phantom Singer 3 In April 2020, his singing shone in the music audition TV show the Phantom Singer 3. In the show, Yoo was complimented as the tenor who could perfectly cover all genres of music, earning him the nickname of "the legendary tenor." Yoo Jae-hoon (Department of Voice, '07) performing "Il Mondo" on Phantom Singer 3. The clip of his singing gained 2.1 million views on Youtube. (Photo courtesy of JTBC) When asked which stage was the most memorable for him during the audition, Yoo picked the final stage during which he sang The Rose. “I sang of my intention to devote myself to the love and attention my fans have given me,” said Yoo. Ending the show and taking first place with 200,000 text votes and 150,000 online votes, Yoo said he had never imagined winning, and wanted to take this opportunity to yet again thank all his fans for cheering for him through the final stage. (Left) Yoo, with his team La Poem, sang on the final stage of Phantom Singer 3. (Photo courtesy of Yoo) Yoo is currently preparing for the Phantom Singer gala concert and its tour schedules. Also, La Poem is anticipating an album release in September. As for the future roads of his younger colleagues in the Department of Voice, Yoo said he would like to advise them that “students need to never give up and give everything their best efforts.” Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-06 29

[Alumni]A Crossover of Traditional and Contemporary Music

Traditional music in Korea is called gugak, which literally means “national music” in Korean. However, as the trends of Western music have been sweeping the music industry for more than half a century, most Koreans feel a sense of distance from traditional music. Ha Yun-ju (Department of Korean Traditional Music, '09) is a Jeongga (a kind of gugak which involves vocal singing) singer who is trying to popularize traditional music through a musical crossover with Western music. Ha Yun-ju (Department of Korean Traditional Music, '09) is a Jeongga singer who is trying to popularize the traditional music of Korea through a crossover with contemporary music. (Photo courtesy of Ha) Ha explained Jeongga as a genre that engrafts music and literature which used to be enjoyed by the upper-classes. “Jeongga reveals a taste for the arts as it leads to inner peace from its slow and steady melody,” said Ha. She added that Jeongga provides a mystic experience by filling in the emptiness of people with lyrical and instructive messages. After entering Hanyang with a full scholarship, Ha started to lay the foundation for her competence as a musician. “Each lesson with the professors helped me grow to be able to meet the standards to survive in the actual field,” said Ha. With the professors’ support as well as her efforts, Ha won the Gold Prize in the 27th Onnara Gugak Competition. However, Ha aspires to more than just mastering Jeongga. She is especially interested in familiarizing other people with this beautiful traditional music. Ha chose a crossover between traditional music and contemporary music as the medium. Upon receiving the KBS Gugak Award in 2018, Ha released her first full-length studio album, Chuseon, which means “a fan in autumn." The album featured contemporary songs sung in the style of Jeongga, expressing the loneliness of a woman saying farewell to her loved one. In addition, Ha is participating in various collaborations with contemporary pop musicians including Kim Junsu, Song So-hee, and Second Moon. Ha feels that she has been tasked with certain responsibilities as a traditional musician, and the crossover is a way of fulfilling them. Chuseon is Ha's first full-length studio album which expresses the loneliness of a woman saying farewell to her loved one. (Photo courtesy of Ha) Other than the crossover, Ha has been involved in diverse projects to popularize traditional music. The Jeongga singer recently released a collection of children's songs after appearing in Who Is Good at This, a singing contest program for children. Ha is preparing to release another full-length album, The Point of Ecstasy, with the poems of Na Tae-ju. Ha also plans to participate in a singing competition program by MBN as a representative of traditional music. “With my music, I am trying to touch the emotions that all Koreans unconsciously carry in their minds,” said Ha. Ha told the members of Hanyang to keep their passion and believe in what they are aiming for. “What you believe is what opens your way to the opportunities,” said Ha. “Even when you feel exhausted, don’t give up and do your best.” Oh Kyu-jin alex684@hanyang.ac.kr

2020-05 12 Important News

[Alumni]Choi Ye-gun, From a Keyboard Prodigy to a Shining Musician

If you have watched Immortal Songs: Singing the Legend, Yoo Hee-yeol's Sketchbook, or the popular Korean audition program K-pop Star, you may be familiar with the name Choi Ye-gun. This famous singer was one of the top 8 competitors of season 2 of K-pop Star and took first place in the singing competition Your name hosted by the popular music channel Yoo Hee-yeol's Sketchbook. Choi Ye-gun, an aspiring musician and a proud alumna of Hanyang University's Department of Applied Music ('19), shared her story of how she fell in love with music and succeeded as a popular indie musician. Choi Ye-gun (Department of Applied Music, '19) shared her story of how she fell in love with music and succeeded as a popular indie musician. Choi dreamt of becoming a musician from the age of five. As a little girl, she always had a keyboard next to her, a trait she carries till now. “There was always a piano in my room since I was little. My mother used to say that I got along with it since I could barely walk!” She remembers that even then, she was interested in expressing melodies through instrument, trying to express the tune she heard from her church. At 20, she applied to the Department of Applied Music at ERICA Campus for a professional musical education. “During my time at school, I was able to study music which transcended the boundaries of genre, from K-pop to jazz and classical music,” said Choi. Choi was one of the top 8 competitors of season 2 of K-pop Star. Along with her studies, Choi also endeavored to develop her own musical ideology and establish her own methodology in composing and arranging music. Her hard work earned her the image of a good storyteller, acknowledged by the media as a singer-songwriter, magnificent in delivering her own stories in songs. Choi considers her ability to deliver someone’s story, transcending the limits of a single genre, as one of her strongest suits. She said, “Since I always consider how a story could be told from a different perspective, I think many different people can relate even to the same song.” When asked to share her secret, Choi explained that she always focuses on how to best deliver a story. “First, I choose a character. Then I write the lyrics in his or her verbal tone. The last thing I do is combine it with a befitting melody. During the process, I begin to naturally arrange the song in the character’s mood and create the dynamics which enable a strong delivery of the story.” Choi also took first place in the singing competition Your name hosted by the popular music channel Yoo Hee-yeol's Sketchbook. Choi said other people’s stories become the cornerstone for many of her songs. “These days, I am especially inspired by the stories of young people.” Naturally, her songs explore stories on diverse topics. Self-reflection, social issues, and interpersonal relationships were all on the chart. “After I establish someone’s story in my mind, I design a character who can deliver that story well – reconstructing the story from another perspective,” explained Choi. Choi also tells some personal stories on her most recent album Even If It Gets Lost, It Can Flow Anyway, introducing two title songs, Lucid Dream and Scarecrow. “The first song, Lucid Dream, is a story of somebody who could not fall asleep and a world where dreams come true. To me, making this very album was exactly that,” said Choi. “Scarecrow is an outcry to the world that wants me to be, so to say, cool. To be recognized, one has to be cool and people want that too. But to that I say, ‘I have done enough!’” Choi jokingly added, “By the way, the chorus part is very addictive, so you better not listen to it before an important exam.” Choi's first original album Even If It Gets Lost, It Can Flow Anyway was released April 22, 2020, introducing two catcy title songs Lucid Dream and Scarecrow. “To me, your story becomes music, and that music becomes a medium which enables others to relate with your tale,” said Choi. “When I produce music, I consider myself as dust. Dust can only shine where there is light. To me, your story is the illumination. Your stories are never little or meaningless.” Lee Yoon-seo cipcd0909@hanyang.ac.kr

2019-10 18

[Alumni]No Seung-chul, a Millennial CEO of a Niche Market

Single life has created a booming business in Korea with many young Koreans embracing single status. These people are referred to as the “sampo generation,” which means a generation that has given up on three things: dating, marriage and children. One place profiting from this phenomenon is the traveling sector. According to the Korea Institute for Industrial Economics and Trade, the number of people traveling alone in Korea is increasing in average at a rate of 54 percent per year. For Hanyang University alumnus No Seung-chul (Department of Industrial Engineering, '18), this was a great opportunity to offer services that no one else was offering. No Seung-chul (Department of Industrial Engineering, '18) is the CEO and a founder of Tripbuddy, a solo traveler matchmaking app. "My company is called Optimize, an information technology company that offers solo travelers a way to find a travel buddy called Tripbuddy,” said No. Tripbuddy is a location-based service that helps solo travelers find people with similar interests. Through the application’s algorithmic matching system, users can find people who plan or are traveling to a similar destination. This service is especially useful for those with a budget, and for those who travel alone but want to participate in partner-only activities. Through the app, users can pay for various activities and restaurants and split the bill amongst themselves. Tripbuddy's official website at web.tripbuddy.im. (Photo courtesy of Tripbuddy) Inception of the business model for Tripbuddy “Creating a start-up was a dream that I have had since I was a freshman in high school,” said No. “For three years, I created a portfolio of over 300 pages and thought of how I could use this to create my own business.” Already from high school, No had around 11 patents in his name. He focused most of his time on finding new business opportunities and decided that he would pursue more throughout his university years as well. Soon, he found the best university to achieve his goals: Hanyang University. “Hanyang is the number one university in creating start-ups, so I thought going to Hanyang would be a good opportunity to create a good foothold for my objective,” said No. He made use of several government support policies when he was applying for patents during high school. Although high school students today have a one patent-per-year restriction for free patent application and lawyer fees, there was no such restriction when No was in high school, and he was able to apply for several, including patents for business models. No thought of creating a location-based service when he was in the army. As a driver, he needed to report his location back to the base, but sometimes this was difficult to explain and troublesome. Thus, he thought creating an easy way to locate one's whereabouts would be high in demand. However, No soon found out that he was the only one interested in the idea. However, it did not stop him. When No became interested in the idea of creating a location-based service, traveling was a big issue, but one service that was not on the market was solo traveling. No started to travel by himself around Korea for four months to see if this market was pursuable. He talked with some 400 people and conducted interviews, which were all recorded and used as a database for his new business. Then, No incorporated the technology that he envisioned into this new platform. When he went back to school, he created a club with like-minded people. In 2017, the club entered a start-up competition sponsored by Hanyang University and SK Telecom. They were awarded the grand prize. With funds from both Hanyang and SK, No was able to create Optimize and rent out an office. No said he plans on expanding Tripbuddy globally and offering it in several languages. No has a busy schedule ahead of him as Tripbuddy is about to launch its own iphone-friendly application. In early October, the travel reservation platform, WAUG Travel Incorporated, proposed a partnership with Tripbuddy to introduce its reservation services in Tripbuddy’s app. "Optimize is a word that means making everything in the world as good as possible,” said No. “Within this definition, focusing on our customers, we think of what a good service for them is and what will benefit them. With consumer-based thinking, we try to offer our customers the best service we can by solving technological issues and creating services.” Jung Myung-suk kenj3636@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-10 07

[Alumni]The First to Pass the National Diplomat Candidate Test

The National Diplomat Candidate Test records a notorious competition rate of 33.6:1. Since the first recruitment in 2013, Hanyang University has not been able to announce any joyous news. However, this September, Kim Shin-bi (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) passed the final test and named herself as the first to pass the National Diplomat Test at Hanyang. Kim Shin-bi (Department of Political Science and International Studies, '18) became the first Hanyang student to pass the Diplomat Candidate Test. Q: First and foremost, congratulations on passing the test! How does it feel to become the first Hanyang student who pass the Diplomat Candidate Test? A: Happy and truly grateful for all the support I received! I also feel a lot of responsibility as the first Hanyangian for how well I perform, which could influence the perception of the next Hanyang applicants. Q: Why did you want to become a diplomat? A: I started having a vague dream of becoming a diplomat in high school when I was studying Korean-fusion music composition. I became interested in making Korea known to the world through music, then naturally, in the broader field of diplomacy. I wanted to become a person who could introduce Korea to the rest of the world. The applicants of the diplomat test need to pass four stages of various assessments. Because of the sheer amount of requirements one needs to be outstanding in, it takes on average about four years to pass the test. Kim said she started from knowing "literally nothing" in 2016, when she entered Hanyang University's Korea National Diplomatic Academy Class. She spent three years at Hanyang and other academies before achieving her goal. Q: What was your daily routine like during those three years? A: Students of the Hanyang class spend the majority of their time at the study room in the College of Social Sciences. At the time, I woke up at 8am and came back to sleep past 12am. This year, I tried to maintain the schedule of waking up at 6:40am and coming back at around 12 to 1am to sleep at 2am. Q: You passed the test after three years of studying, achieving a relatively early success. Are there any test tips you could share? A: There are three tests. First of all, you need a high score in English, a second language, and Korean history to be qualified to take the test. The first test is a written test on the constitution and Public Service Aptitude Test. Even if you are not fully ready, I recommend you to have a go at the first test and see how it goes. The second stage consists of five essay exams, which may seem overwhelming at first because they require ten pages of writing within two hours. Following the academy curriculum, and their years of know-hows, helped me get a sense of how to prepare for the test. The last test is a series of interviews, consisting of English group discussion, a situational interview, an individual presentation and interview. As for the third round, there is not much to worry about. It is known that, generally, the score from the second round determines the outcome, unless you were exceptionally good or bad. Kim shared her study routine and test tips and expressed gratitude to the Hanyang Diplomatic Academy Class, encouraging interested students to join the class. Kim said she gained much help from the Diplomatic Academy Class. The class was formed in 2013 and recruits new members every semester. Students need to submit a letter of self-introduction, meet certain qualification requirements, and take a trial examination and interview to become a member. Kim advised that, if you are new to the diplomat test, start from the Hanyang Diplomatic Academy Class where you will be able to gain the necessary information. Q: There are many benefits offered to students in the Diplomatic Academy Class. What were some of the most helpful benefits? A: It is not an exaggeration to say that I would not have passed the test without help from the class. One of the biggest concerns in enduring long-term study is the cost. The class offers expensive lectures, monthly trial tests, and study rooms for free. They even offer dormitory scholarships for dormitory residents and a food expense scholarship. Moreover, the passionate atmosphere played a crucial role in keeping up with the harsh schedule. For instance, everybody gets up early in the morning, so I couldn’t be the only one left behind. Click to visit Korea National Diplomatic Academy Class website Kim will be entering the Korea National Diplomatic Academy at the end of the year. After a 52-week training course, she will become a formal diplomat, making her dream come true on a wider and more global stage. Q: What kind of diplomat do you wish to become in the future? A: I’m interested in the protocol, which is related to being in charge of providing for the state guests. It will provide an excellent chance to promote Korea. I’m also interested in economic diplomacy because it is one of the most influential and crucial aspects for people. Q: Lastly, any word of encouragement to future Hanyang diplomats? A: It really is a battle with yourself. The worst part is knowing that hard work does not always bare a fruit, and the anxiety that all those years could become nothing in the end torments you. Although I have also seen many people who have changed their course of life after a few trials at the test, every one of them was able to find the right route for themselves, and they say the study does become useful somewhere. So I wish you could study believing that it will never be in vain. It’s a pain that nobody else can understand. Cheer up! You can make it! Lim Ji-woo il04131@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-09 05

[Alumni]Designer Alumnus Cho Deuk-lae Creates the ERICA Campus Character, ‘Hanyangi’

The number of followers for the Hanyang University ERICA Campus' official Facebook page has increased from around 400 in 2018 to 4,700 as of now. At the center of the surge of followers is the character, ‘Hanyangi.’ We had a sit-down chat with designer and creator of Hanyangi, Cho Deuk-lae (Department of Techono-product Design 11). Hanyangi is a Hanyang University mascot that every Hanyangian must have run across at least once. It caught popularity as the representative emoticon of Hanyang University's ERICA Campus. The ERICA Campus' official Facebook account held a competition to mimic the Hanyangi drawing, and students inserted Hanyangi into their presentation materials. ▲ A photo of Hanyang University's ERICA Campus character, 'Hanyangi' (Photo courtesy of ERICA Campus Office of External Affairs and Development) There were several efforts before Cho to try to create an emoticon to represent the school. Professors, graduate students, and companies put their efforts into the act but did not gain much popularity. The developed emoticons were difficult to transform their shapes, as the features and lines were complex. Cho transformed the HY-lion character to design a simpler figure. The character was formed in an easy manner, in a way that could still bring out its funny charm. He received an outsourcing request from the school, and the original design was released a month after March of 2017, when manufacturing of Hanyangi began. Initially, Cho hoped that the school would lead a channel that could narrow down the gap with students. A mascot takes up a big role in making students feel more familiar to the SNS page. He anticipated that Hanyangi could act as a mascot, seeing from the positive reactions. Cho himself walked into the Office of External Affairs and Development and suggested that he create a promotion team for the ERICA Facebook page, which was not managed well at the time. The school responded by telling him to gather the members of his promotion team. ▲ Cho Deuk-lae (Department of Techono-product Design 11) alumnus said, "For the span of a character to last a long time, it must be easily drawn by others." Building a character to make it a mascot was not easy. Cho said, “It was work to realize one complete character, including internet tone and character personality settings.” He also mentioned that the process was a continuity of difficulty, as various content had to be created utilizing the character. “I developed the original design of Hanyangi, but all members of the SNS promotion team built the character together afterwards,” said Cho, giving credit to his teammates. In truth, Hanyangi gained the most awareness in 2018, the year that the SNS promotion team was assembled. ▲ A cartoon scene published on the ERICA Campus Facebook page. Hanyangi is utilized freely beyond its use as a campus emoticon. (Photo courtesy of the ERICA Campus Office of External Affairs and Development) “It is my hope that any student would feel close to the character and use them.” Cho was intending to yield all licenses regarding the character to Hanyang University from the very initial stage of Hanyangi development. He merely laid down a condition of maintaining it open source, so that students could access them freely. Hanyangi is accessible during inside and outside school promotion, club activities, or academic use without a separate copyright mark. However, its use for the purpose of slandering the school is prohibited. “Students are free to modify its form in diverse ways to express their emotions,” said alumnus Cho.

2019-03 12

[Alumni]From an Architect to an Illustrator

While some university students choose their double majors in accordance with their academic preferences and passions, others only apply for the majors that correspond to certain conditions such as grades. For the latter group, it is important that they find their true interest during their college years. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator from the Department of Architecture who went through such a situation. His life-long dream of becoming an architect changed into the dream of being an illustrator who inspires and pleases young readers. Jung Jin-ho (Department of Architecture, ’13) is an illustrator who is an alumnus of the Department of Architecture. He is reading his award-winning picture book Wall. Originally, Jung’s dream was to become a renowned architect, which is why he chose the Department of Architecture. During his 4th year, he signed a contract for a year-long internship at the architecture company he always wanted to join. However, the reality was considerably different from his expectations, and this internship experience became the turning point of reconsidering his original dream. Jung struggled to find a job that genuinely suited his passion during his 5th year of college, since his life-long goal to become a successful architect had suddenly collapsed due to the experience of the frustrating reality of the field. While he was contemplating his future, Jung recalled that since his childhood he had always liked reading picture books. Due to a serious burn he had received, Jung had to spend most of his time in the hospital. “I made a lot of friends at the hospital. Some of them were seriously ill. I remember a friend who had lost an arm. However, I had no prejudice against them. They were just like ordinary people and I felt no sense of difference between us. Through this experience at the hospital, I learned that having such bias was meaningless,” Jung stated. As activities for children are quite limited in the hospital, it was natural that he read a lot of picture books, which eventually became a major hobby that lasted to his adulthood. Considering his childhood background, Jung decided to create a picture book that also included a story of his 5th year of university life. Jung made four pieces in total that year. An Elephant Living in My House illustration (우리집에 코끼리가 산다) by Jung Jin-ho (Photo courtesy of Jung's Grafolio) The books Look up! (위를 봐요!), Wall (벽), Soil and a Worm (벽과 지렁이), and Owl (부엉이), received great attention and love from the public, and also won Jung an award. The piece Look up! was especially highly evaluated in terms of architecture. He applied what he had learned in university over four years to his book, and this challenging spirit and refreshing attempt gained recognition from experts. Jung notes, “Whereas many authors get inspiration from other peoples’ stories, I focus on my past experiences. In Wall I reflected the knowledge I learned from my major, and in 3 Second Diving I reflected on my elementary school life. Since my first piece, which was the primary momentum to become an illustrator-author, reflects the most about my personal story, I feel the greatest attachment to it.” After receiving several awards, he gets numerous calls from interested libraries and schools. Jung also has been giving lectures to both teenagers and adults since 2015. The content of the lectures differs depending on the audiences' level of understanding level about art. For younger generations, he prepares a variety of activities such as building blocks and drawing simple pictures, while giving theoretical explanations of picture books to adults. While he travels around giving lectures, he plans to write one or two books a year at the same time. Jung hopes university students find their genuine interest. It was lucky for him to debut in the field of illustration and novels, as Professor Kang Min-kyung from the College of Humanities sent Jung’s pieces to several publishing companies, all of which offered a positive response. Jung’s goal is not grand. He just wants to maintain his career in this field for a lifetime; however, many illustrators are unable to due to inconsistent income. Jung said, “There was one respectable professor that I really liked. He always insisted that becoming a master is achieved when you constantly put forth a strong effort without craving for it. I just want to survive in this field and work for my true interest.” Jung adds, “Many people work in a different area that is irrelevant to their major, but it’s okay. By doing so, they can make their own attractive story. Broaden your perspective and be confident. Everything you have learned can always be helpful to what you will be in the future.” Kim Min-jae fhffl5781@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Hyeon-seon

2019-03 11

[Alumni]The 2019 Icon of Korean Tradition

The Brand Prize Award, hosted by The Korean Herald, is given to those who have made a significant achievement in their field over the year. Having been recognized for her efforts with the gayageum, also known as the Korean harp, Park Ji-yun (Department of Korean Traditional Music, Doctorate, '16) was awarded the Grand Prize for the Arts Sector of the 2019 Brand Prize Award. As a traditional musician who has played the gayageum for over 30 years, Park's new goal has been to pass her knowledge on to her students, starting her life as a teacher. As a musician Starting with playing the piano during her early years, Park showed a talent for music. She first encountered the gayageum as a hobby, having been attracted by its monophonic features. Switching from the piano to the gayageum when she was 13, it has been over 30 years since Park has played the traditional Korean instrument. During her long years of devotion, Park has managed to make major achievements within the field. Park successfully put on a concert last December with the Seocho Philharmoniker, being the first to have an accompanied performance with a symphony orchestra. (Click to go to the video of Park's accompanied performance) “The gayageum is often regarded as a boring and dull form of music by many. I wanted to overcome this wrong belief that many carry, and in order to do so, I had to take some new departures,” explained Park. She further explained how the orchestra is often considered main stream within the musical field and, thus, she wanted to show how the gayageum can be successfully collaborated with other more popular forms of music. Park is also preparing two albums which she is planning to release by next year at the latest. Park has long put in efforts towards making the gayageum closer to the public. (Photo courtesy of Park) Park stated that her first album is one that is going to focus on the traditional features of the gayageum. Having entered her forties, Park explained that she wanted to record and share her recitals, which have now been accumulated with over 30 years of practice. On the other hand, the second album is to be a duet with the electone, an electronic organ that has features of automatic accompaniments and tone modulation, which is a new challenge to the gayageum. Such efforts show Park’s long desire of bringing the gayageum closer to the public through various innovations, while still stressing its traditional features. As a professor Having majored in the gayageum during her high school and college years, Park further pursued her studies at Hanyang University, receiving both her master's and doctorate degrees in the field of traditional Korean music. Park first focused on gaining practical experience by joining an orchestra after her college graduation. After playing with the orchestra until her early thirties, however, Park decided to change her career path towards becoming an instructor and sharing her knowledge of the gayageum. First starting her teaching career at Gugak National High School, it was during these years that Park became determined to pursue her studies within the field. While studying for her doctorate, Park was also given the opportunity to teach at Hanyang University. In addition to having lessons with the students majoring in Korean traditional music, Park has also taught courses for other majors such as the Department of Composition, as they had to widen their scope of music. During her teaching career, Park stated that it is when her students are praised by others that she feels the most worthwhile. Park is now focusing on transferring her deep knowledge of the gayageum along to her students as a professor. (Photo courtesy of Park) Now holding an additional post as a professor for the Department of Korean Traditional Music in Hanyang University, Park maintained that her main goal as a professor is to bring honor to both the department and the school. In order to do so, she stated that she will not only pursue her own career in the field of the gayageum, but also help her students become musicians of higher levels within their own field. More than thirty years have passed since she first started playing the gayageum, and it seems as if Park’s passion is filled both as a musician and a professor. Choi Seo-yong tjdyd1@hanyang.ac.kr

2018-12 10

[Alumni]Passing the 41st Actuaries Examination

The new International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS17) will be implemented for insurance companies by 2022, which will change the debt evaluation standard from a prime cost to a market price. This means more actuaries are in need in order to prevent an increase in debt and reduction in capital for insurance companies. Under such conditions, a banner that congratulated those who passed the 41st actuaries examination at the ERICA campus put a smile on many. Two students among the three listed are among the first accepted from the Department of Actuarial Science. (From left) Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th hear), Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, '17), and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) The first-round exam scores out of a 100, and all subjects except English must be above 40 points with the average being above 60 in order to pass. Those who passed the first round exam are qualified to take the second round exam within the next 5 years, including the year that they passed the first exam. All 5 subjects must achieve a score of 60 or higher in order to pass the final exam. The first-round exam consists of 5 subjects: The first subject includes insurance contract law, insurance business acts, and employee retirement benefit security act. The rest are insurance mathematics, principles of economics, accounting principles, and English, which is a subject that can be replaced by official English test scores. In the first-round exam, Kim Bo-geun and Seo Ye-ji both found accounting difficult because they usually study the subject by writing out descriptive answers to problems, whereas the exam had multiple choice questions. They repeatedly practiced solving various questions and tried to memorize the format. The subjects covered in the second-round exam are actuarial risk management, actuarial mathematics, pension science, actuarial model theory, and lastly, financial management and financial engineering. The interviewees all agreed that financial management and financial engineering was the toughest part to study. “You only need a 100 in order to pass the exam, but the examination covers 300,” said Kim Bo-geun. Seo Ye-ji (Department of Actuarial Science, ’17) and Joo Hyung-min (Master's Degree in Insurance and Finance) prepared for the exam while working at an insurance company, and Kim Bo-geun (Department of Actuarial Science, 4th year) is currently attending the last semester before his early graduation and has already found a position at an insurance company. Seo and Kim began to learn more about what an actuary does when they were sophomores in college, and the department of Actuarial Science actively supported the career paths of students in becoming actuaries. The interviewees emphasized that becoming an actuary gives you pride that you have a specialized job. As for their struggles for the exam, Kim said he did not go through a slump, thanks to the timely trips that he took once in a while, and an hour of daily exercise that helped him stay healthy inside and out. Seo prevented any slumps by trying not to be shaken by her emotions and having enough sleep. Joo agreed that he was not stressed much during the exam preparation period. He said that he had fun studying for the Society of Actuaries (SOA), which is an American actuaries exam because it felt as if he was studying English. “The passing of the SOA exam was a big motivation for me to do better in the Korean actuaries exam.” The SOA exams cover a lot of content that the Korean exam is tested on. All three of them passed the SOA exam as well. Although there are unexpected fluctuations in actuaries exams each year, the exam is gradually becoming easier. A total of 124 people passed the exam this year, which is 62 more people than last year. Studying for the exam is important, but business practice and work experience is what gives you an advantage when looking for a job, said Seo Ye-ji. “I was surprised at first by the gap between the real work and the things I studied. Company work is much more complicated than just finding an answer in a book. I recommend you to look for work experience whether it is part time work or working as an intern at a company. You need to have an idea of how things work around here.” Seo Ye-ji went on to say that she wants to thank the school and the professors for making a department that majors in actuarial science and for building an atmosphere where students could effectively chase a dream of becoming an actuary. Kim Hyun-soo soosoupkimmy@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Kang Cho-hyun

2018-12 04

[Alumni]Onestar on a Steady Rise

BTS, TWICE, Super Junior – these are only a few of the K-pop idol groups that enjoy global attention. Before influencers became a thing, becoming an idol was one of the top dreams of young Korean teenagers. However, as many have tried, it is extremely hard to pass through cut throat competitions, let alone hit the charts with a song loved and supported by the public. Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) was one of the exceptional cases that proved that years of hard work and a sprinkle of talent can get you to places. Ever since Lim was young, he had a strong passion for singing. Naturally, he wanted to become a singer and was officially able to become a trainee at the age of 19. Luckily for Lim, he was able to make his debut in just a year as the main vocal in an idol group called “Monday Kiz.” “My trainee period wasn’t that long as it only took me a year to debut. I don’t think I was that good, but I’m guessing they saw some potential in me. The group also needed a main vocalist, so I was lucky. Of course, life as a trainee and a student wasn’t easy. I had to take many breaks from school because the training itself was strenuous." “I've worked so hard to earn my nickname as a 'vocal-textbook,' and I will always strive to do so.” Lim Han-byul (Department of Information Sociology, ERICA campus, '15) (Photo courtesy by Most Contents) After five years of his life as an idol, Lim made the decision to stand out as a solo artist. On his first few attempts during practice, he realized how difficult it was to finish one song. “After years of on-stage experience, I never thought finishing one song by myself would be a problem. It hit me hard that I was basically formulated into singing as a group member, not a solo artist. It took me a year or two just practicing until I finally got on track. That’s also when I started my YouTube channel,” said Lim. Lim's cover on M.C THE MAX - No Matter Where (Video courtesy of Lim's YouTube channel) Lim is not only known as an ex-member of Monday Kiz, but also as a YouTuber with over 157 thousand subscribers. “I think it was around 2015 when I opened my channel. Back then, YouTube hadn't gained its popularity yet, and there weren’t that many covers on it either. I wasn’t looking for fame. I was simply looking for a platform where I could share my progress with my fans, and YouTube seemed like a great opportunity,” said Lim. As an interesting fact, 97 percent of Lim’s viewers are known to be male. To this fact, Lim commented, “I think it’s because I mostly sang pieces that guys would like. I don’t think I’m the best singer out there so they see how hard I try and feel that vicarious satisfaction. Some also practice with me.” “Multiple failures actually made me stronger. I was able to make many valuable artist friends and focus on studying music." (Photo courtesy of Lim) Lim is also an acknowledged and steady-growing singer-songwriter as well as a vocal guide. He was known for having participated in numerous songs of V.O.S., JYJ, Sunnyhill, Super Junior, NCT Dream and many more. “I didn’t have anything to lose. After Monday Kidz disbanded, I started from the very bottom again and worked as a trainer and a vocal guide. Right now, I am working with Mono Tree, a global music production and publishing company also known for working with a lot of SM artists. My new digital single, “The Way to Say Goodbye” is also with that company,” said Lim. “I'm trying to find the right balance as a singer and a songwriter. My experience as an artist in such broad fields has taught me how to look at the bigger scheme of things over the years and to think from a staff member's perspective." “The Way to Say Goodbye” is a song that depicts the story of a person on his way to end his relationship. As it is Lim’s first digital single, it took a special place in his heart. According to Lim, since he is not a genius, he gets his inspiration after hours of focusing, contemplating, and editing. His new single was also a product of many weeks of listening to numerous “good” music on top of a rough sketch that fairly reflects his turbulent twenties. Lim plans on releasing his next single album early next year. Despite the continuous build-up of success as a solo artist, Lim was astonishingly humble. Throughout the interview, he did not stop mentioning how much he needed to improve. When asked if such manner of speech could indirectly bring negative influence on his self-respect, Lim chuckled and said, “I am the type of person to easily feel proud and maybe even a bit conceited. If you really think about it, I had years of experience as an idol, as a vocal trainer, a guide, and a singer-songwriter. But this is also because I had failed as an idol which left me in a place to keep pushing myself. In my case, there’s only a fine line between failure and success. The moment I think I’m actually doing great, I start slacking off and be well on my way to failure again.” "Good music is whatever sounds good to you." (Photo courtesy by Lim) “We all have different values, so I don’t really believe in giving advice. However, there is one thing I do want to say and that’s to get your priorities straight, and act upon it accordingly. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes because opportunities do come and when they do, make sure to take it.” The Way to Say Goodbye - Onestar / Lim Han-byul (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Hee Jae - Lim Han-byul Cover (Video courtesy by Lim's YouTube channel) Mono Tree's Facebook Page Most Contents (Lim's management company) Park Joo-hyun julia1114@hanyang.ac.kr Photos by Lee Jin-myung